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Showing posts from January, 2017

A new article on Frog Feeding with collaborators from GA Tech!

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The frog tongue is a high-speed adhesiveAlexis Noel, Georgia Institute of Technology, David Hu, Georgia Institute of Technology and Mark Mandica, The Amphibian Foundation
How does one get stuck studying frog tongues? Our study into the sticky, slimy world of frogs all began with a humorous video of a real African bullfrog lunging at fake insects in a mobile game. This frog was clearly an expert at gaming; the speed and accuracy of its tongue could rival the thumbs of texting teenagers.

The frog that was the genesis of the authors’ tongue research.
Further YouTube research yielded amazing videos of frogs eating mice, tarantulas and even other frogs.
The versatile frog tongue can grab wet, hairy and slippery surfaces with equal ease. It does a lot better than our engineered adhesives – not even household tapes can firmly stick to wet or dusty surfaces. What makes this tongue even more impressive is its speed: Over 4,000 species of frog and toad snag prey faster than a human can blink. …

Ribbed Newt, #Pleurodeles waltl just after breeding today at the Amphibian Foundation

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New Amphibian Foundation Interns Gabe and Tessa

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Things have been so heavy and serious lately, and The Amphibian Foundation - along with many wonderful ecological and conservation agencies have a lot to lose with these recent governmental finding cuts. Many of these species certainly don't have 4 or 8 years to wait until biodiversity is a priority again. This image (which I did not take) cheers me up and I hope it will make you smile too. I mean, what's cuter than a baby veiled chameleon?

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Sonya Wood Mahler from Cobb County Watershed Stewardship Program visits The Amphibian Foundation

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Pierson Hill and FFWCC partners find and collect over 530 Frosted Flatwoods Salamander eggs this season

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Can you tell what this is?

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Since I met my first Pipa pipa (Suriname Toad) I have been completely enamored with this species. Their huge flat bodies, their bizarre courting, breeding and reproductive behavior, the fact that tiny Pipas pop out of mom’s back — the list goes on and on — Right down to the wackadoodle star-shaped fingertip lobes on each of the creepy fingers.

Using SEM, one can see that each lobe of the star-shaped lobes branches out into 4 more star-shaped lobes — and so on, and so on — maximizing the surface area for still yet unknown reasons. They definitely use their fingers to detect prey — you can observe them rooting around in the substrate locating food — but are there receptors at the ends of these lobes? Are they chemoreceptive? Gustatory? Electroreceptive? … fascinating.

Pipids lack tongues and teeth! They capture and transport prey through a mechanism called suction feeding. As the name implies, suction feeders engulf prey with the surrounding water an…

'The Burrow' @ Blue Heron has a new friend! An Axolotl

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An axolotl is a type of salamander from Central America. They are nearly extinct in the wild, but are thriving in captive collections. Some of them are brown speckled (wild type). Others, like the one pictured here are leucistic (or lacking much of the pigment). There are many interesting things about axolotls (other than the inherent coolness about being a salamander).

As you can see from the picture, Armie's left arm is backwards. He grew up that way, but axolotls can regrow their limbs! If Armie's deformation occured by an injury or trauma during early development, then there is a good chance his arm would grow back properly if it was removed. However, if his arm is backwards due to genetic mutation, then it would most likely regrow exactly as it is. Either way, we are not going to try that experiment in The Burrow, but it is neat to think about.

Another incredible thing about axolotls, is that they never fully metamorphose. The stay in their larval form throughout their l…

@Regrann from @pipatoes - Tune in tomorrow morning on Atlanta's NPR station to learn about the Amphibian Foundation (6:45 & 8:45 am and 4:44pm) - #regrann

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Big News! We are extremely excited to announce our official partnership with the Amphibian Survival Alliance! As a partner with the ASA, we will be connected to the largest network of amphibian researchers and conservationists in the world! The Amphibian Foundation continues to grow everyday! We need your support! If you haven’t become a member yet, you can go to our website: amphibianfoundation.org and click on ‘How You Can Help’ — Even if you can’t afford to help the foundation financially, there are so many things you can do to support us, and our global amphibian communities. #amphibianfoundation #theamphibianfoundation #amphibianconservation #frogsneedourhelp

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Reigning Reptiles Rules! The newest partner of The Amphibian Foundation

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Reigning Reptiles in Buford led (and owned) by Cyndi Moore is our newest partner and a huge supporter of The Amphibian Foundation. Besides being the only legit reptile shop in the greater Atlanta area, today they donated a large number of cool, rare, unique and impressive reptiles and amphibians for both our captive breeding and educational programs.









‘Coppie’ our ambassador for Copperhead conservation ...

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 must have been bored with me trying to photograph him. What might look like an act of fangy aggression, is actually just him yawning. Copperheads, and all snakes are here for a reason! They are fulfilling an important role in our ecosystem, and they just want to be left alone so they can do it. It’s your right to kill any snake on your property, but we urge people to use our Translocation Program as an alternative to killing the snake. If you choose to exercise your right to kill snakes on your property, you then relinquish your right to complain about rodent infestations and lime disease, both of which are controlled naturally by snakes. So far, 3 of the 31 calls we have received have actually been Copperheads. The majority have been Water Snakes (Nerodia sp.) and Brown Snakes (Storeria decayi). Often we are sent pictures of these poor harmless snakes with their heads already cut off. No doubt, snakes freak people out — but they are fascinating, …
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