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Showing posts from May, 2017

Young Ranitomeya vanzolinii (Spotted Poison Frog) in the Herpetology Lab at The Amphibian Foundation. This is a very bold and interesting species that spends most of its time in plain view inside the vivarium. Unlike many species of dendrobatids the parents of Ranitomeya vanzolinii offspring return to feed their young. They will lay their fertile egg in an isolated pool. A bromeliad which has filled with water is an ideal place. Once the tadpole hatches the female encouraged by the male will lay an infertile egg into the small pool, this provides the tadpole with a food source until it can fend for itself. The parents form a stable pair during this period We are working with these frogs through a donation/partnership with Shore Things Exotics. #Ranitomeya #Ranitomeyavanzolinii #PoisonFrog #PoisonFrogs #Frog #Frogs #FrogsOfInstagram #AmphibianFoundation

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Myths about Cottonmouths

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COTTONMOUTH VIDEO UNDERCUTS MYTHCottonmouth in a south Georgia stream (Matt Moore) By MATT MOORE Judging by comments at public education programs I’ve done, cottonmouths are the most misunderstood and maligned of Georgia's six native species of venomous snakes. I have worked in close proximity with manycottonmouths (aka water moccasins)over the years and I encounter dozens each year in the south Georgia swamps where I conduct wetland field work. Yet I’ve never had a cottonmouth chase me – a prominent myth concerning this species – or try to bite me. Earlier this month while wading in a narrow, shallow stream in a south Georgia swamp, I met a large eastern cottonmouth – approximately 4 feet long – swimming upstream.My video of the encountershows the snake's initial curiosity as it tries to figure out what this large obstruction in its path is. After deciding that I’m an animate object and thus a potential predator, the snake decides to avoid the threat by swimming around me. L…

More great resources for making your yard (pool) amphibian safe!

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Erin Zaballa, Environmental Educator at Pettit Environmental Preserve and Vice President of the GA Reptile Society shared this info and pictures for how she made her pool 'amphibian safe'. As you probably know, it is not just the chemicals present in most swimming pools that are lethal to frogs and salamanders that might inadvertently (or advertantly!) fall/jump in a pool — it is also very difficult for them to find a way out. (if they aren't poisoned, they drown)




Luckily, there are some devices to aide our native amphibians in exiting the pools.





'The blue ramps are called Frog Logs, it is recommended to have at least one on each end of the pool. The other item is the Critter Skimmer skimmer cover. It allows animals sucked into the skimmer to escape via a ramp and tiny door. One really great thing is that if the ramp is not long enough, they will send you an extension for free (just pay shipping).


The Frog Logs and Critter Skimmer work exactly as advertised, mine h…

It's that time of year for Turtles Crossing the Road — Find out what you can do to help them.

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The glorious Colorado River Toad (Sonoran Desert Toad)

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Incilius alvarius is the most basal of the Incilius group. Formerly most toads, and particularly the toads of the New World, were nested in the genus ‘Bufo’. Several years ago, this group was split into several genera with the majority of North American bufonids placed into the Anaxyrus genus. The Colorado River Toad is one of the exceptions. One of the largest toads, I. alvarius is a magnificent species with several extra-partotoid glands located throughout it’s body. It’s poison is also uncommon in the bufonid world, containing hallucinogenic compounds along with the bufotoxin. For this reason, the species has been over-collected. That in addition to the pressures that all of today’s amphibian communities have to face (climate change, habitat loss, emergent infectious disease, etc …) this species is considered declining throughout much of its range. We are grateful to have a breeding group of these animals to work with (donation courtesy of Reigni…

Isn't the word #conserve kinda but right into 'conservatism'? Come on people, our Earth is dying an unnatural death. We are working hard to save our previous Amphibians, but that is such a small piece. What good are conservation breeding programs if there is no where to release the offspring? Water quality, our #wetlands, the #EndangeredSpeciesAct, protected habitats - they are all on the line right now. Yes, Amphibians, like this #CriticallyEndangered Lemur Leaf Frog are some of the first animals to respond to imbalances in the environment - and they are responding! Recent updates estimate that 43% of the world's Amphibians are in decline or already extinct. Help us join together and do something positive for our global Amphibian communities. #amphibian #amphibians #frog #frogs #FrogsOfInstagram #LeafFrog #Phyllomedusine

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A great visit and some new board members at the Amphibian Foundation

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Some Timely Info About Native Snakes and You — by John Jensen, DNR

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Questions About Snakes? DNR Has Answers FORSYTH, Ga. (4/27/2017) From spring through summer, calls and emails about snakes are a given at Georgia Department of Natural Resources offices. Yet most of those contacts involve only two questions: What species is this and what do I do with it? “Only every once in a while, is it a venomous snake,” said John Jensen, a senior wildlife biologist with DNR’s Nongame Conservation Section and co-author of “Amphibians and Reptiles of Georgia. ”Whether it’s a venomous snake is, of course, the concern or outright fear underlying most of the questions. Chances are it’s not, Jensen said. Only six of the 46 species native to Georgia are venomous and only one – the copperhead – usually thrives in suburban areas, where the majority of Georgians live. What to do, then, if you spot a snake? Try to identify it from a distance. Resources such as www.georgiawildlife.com/GeorgiaSnakes, which includes DNR’s “Venomous Snakes of Georgia” brochure, can help.Do not t…