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Showing posts from July, 2018

Last Steps for Metamorphosis Meadow — Gopher Frog Mesocosms!

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We are nearly complete with our outdoor conservation research facility — an array of 20 tri-phasic mesocosms nicknamed 'Metamorphosis Meadow' or MetaMo.

Todays Task: the completion of 3 sandhill mesocosms designed for the captive breeding of Georgia's rarest frog, the Gopher Frog (Lithobates capito). The source populations for the 11 year assisted metamorphosis and experimental release program continue to decline, so we have teamed up with Zoo Atlanta, Georgia DNR, UGA and USFWS to establish captive breeding groups of the species.


#StayFrosty and support Frosted Flatwoods Salamander conservation! https://ift.tt/2O5QRnT become a Flatwoods Salamander level member and get this shirt for free! members.amphibianfoundation.org Be #AmphibiousAF

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A lovely Spring Peeper from our education collection. Peepers have been a big hit this year on Frog Day for #CritterCamp. We love getting kids excited about our awesome native amphibians — #Peeper #SpringPeeper #Pseudacris

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My little boy, Anthony helping to preserve a Copperhead for the fluid collection. He is the best helper in the world. #Nooch

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Join us to help save amphibians from further declines — members.amphibianfoundation.org

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Lovely Cochranella granulosa, the Granular Glass Frog.One of the most magnificent frogs there is, and I am grateful to have had the opportunity to work with them. #GlassFrog #Cochranella #centrolenidae

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Abstract Salamander 'Watercolor'Trying out some new techniques, and I am out of my element — but it's fun!

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Tiger Salamander Pattern Perspective. I love these goofy, agro salamanders

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Gopher Frog, Lithobates capito
 Conservation Status: Threatened The Gopher Frog is the rarest frog in Georgia. The Amphibian Foundation and partners have been head-starting this species for 10 years. Head-starting is a conservation tool where eggs are collected from the wild. Then, the eggs are cared for until they hatch, and the tadpoles are raised through metamorphosis. The froglets are then released back into the wild into protected habitats. Gopher Frogs are imperiled in part because they are indigenous to the Long Leaf Pine ecosystem, which has been reduced by 97% of it’s original range in the south-east US. Gopher Frogs inhabit the burrows built by other imperiled species living in the Long Leaf Pine ecosystem such as Gopher Tortoises and Pocket Gophers. Gopher Frogs, and hundreds of other species like Indigo Snakes and Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes share the Gopher Tortoise burrows to escape from the heat and wildfires which occur regularly in the region. Gopher Frogs breed in ephemeral, or seasonal wetlands that only hold water for short periods of time. They will not breed in permanent wetlands or ponds that have failed to dry out prior to their breeding season. Many species of amphibian rely on these seasonal pools to breed, and while it adds pressure — the tadpoles have to complete metamorphosis before the ponds dry out — it does insure they can develop in the absence of predatory fish which obviously can’t persist in a wetland which dries regularly. This is an illustration that came out particularly well ;)

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I shall call her Cecilia — currently my favorite #FishSnake #Ichthyophis ... Experimenting with less scientificky drawings :)

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