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Showing posts from June, 2018

Fringed Leaf Frog, Cruziohyla craspedopus 
Conservation Status: Decreasing A beautiful and mysterious frog, little is known about the Fringed Leaf Frog. They live high in the canopy of the Amazon forest and rarely, if ever come to the ground. They are tree hole breeders and use the small amount of water that collects in trees where fallen branches can leave a hole. The tadpoles develop in these micro habitats and emerge as one of the most beautiful frogs in the world They are named from the prominent fringe on their legs. This fringe breaks up the outline of the frog making it look like part of the leaf, or lichen growth rather than a frog. This frog hides in plain sight all day while it sleeps on top of large leaves invisible to predators. Staff from AF are one of the first people to breed this species in captivity. #AmphibiousAF #LeafFrog

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Granular Glass Frog, Cochranella granulosa
 Conservation Status: Data Deficient Granular Glass Frogs are one of the frog species that most resemble Kermit. All frogs have granular glands throughout their skin, but these glands are clearly visible on the back of C. granulosa. This species lays its eggs on leaves over streams. When the eggs hatch, the tadpoles drop down and complete development in the streams. This can take well over a year! The tadpoles appear pink, but really their skin is also clear and glass-like so the blood vessels are visible - giving the larvae a pink hue. Not enough information is known about the populations of Granular Glass Frogs to know whether they are stable or in decline #AmphibiousAF #GlassFrog

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Lemur Leaf Frog, Agalychnis lemur
 Conservation Status: Critically Endangered One of the smallest species of Leaf Frogs. They have excellent camouflage and actually sleep on the underside of leaves during the day. A nocturnal species, they turn from bright green to a brownish red at night. #AmphibiousAF #LeafFrog

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Black-eyed Leaf Frogs are a critically endangered species of Leaf Frog (subfamily Phyllomedusinae). Their eyes are such a deep dark red, that they appear black. The species is native to Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico but is declining rapidly in the wild placing this species an imminent risk of extinction. #AmphibiousAF #LeafFrog

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Blue-sided Leaf Frogs are still declining in the wild. Predominantly from Costa Rica Leaf Frogs or Monkey Frogs (family Phyllomedusidae) are so named because they often lay their eggs on leaves or other structures above water. When the eggs hatch the tadpoles drop down into the water below. Leaf and Monkey Frogs are a specialized relative of Tree Frogs (family Hylidae) from Central and South America. #AmphibiousAF #LeafFrog

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