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Showing posts from October, 2019

Not a great picture, but I was amazed by the ringed pattern on this #MarbledSalamander we discovered last week during the #MasterHerpetologist field trip⁠ ⁠ I wanted to share it for #AmbystomaWeek

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A rare glimpse of a young Frosted Flatwoods Salamander inside our #Rainchamber at the #AmphibianFoundation⁠ ⁠ When I get in early enough, I can generally see one or two of these young salamanders before they disappear into their burrows⁠ ⁠ #StayFrosty

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Our indoor #FlatwoodsSalamander #Rainchamber for breeding Atlantic Coast Frosted Flatwoods Salamanders — the most imperiled clade of this species.⁠ ⁠ Plants from their nesting habitat collected by #AF #GADNR and #FFWCC⁠ ⁠ #AmbystomaWeek #StayFrosty

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Master Herpetologist Field Trip: Search for Marbled Salamanders in Atlanta!

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We had another successful October field trip to Constitution Lakes (Dekalb County, GA), this time with the Master Herpetologist students. Constitution Lakes is a fantastic urban site for an autumn field survey. Future Master Herpetologists, Anthony, and myself shared pictures for this article.
We found many adult Marbled Salamanders, but not as many nests as last year. Perhaps we haven't had enough rain yet in Atlanta to trigger a full migration.

Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) are a common species throughout most of their range, but not in Atlanta, where they were undoubtedly once common. Now, our community science surveys have only detected one population of the species in metro Atlanta, and that is at Constitution Lakes. For more information on Marbled Salamanders, and the AF community science program (MAAMP) see the program website: www.maamp.us






AF Co-Founder Crystal Mandica talking about #MarbledSalamanders during #CrittersAndCabernet - our monthly series for adults.⁠ ⁠ Always a great time, the first Friday of every month here in Atlanta at the Amphibian Foundation.⁠ ⁠ #AmbystomaWeek

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Since the 2018 #AmbystomaWeek — I was able to get another #SpottedSalamander on the news!⁠ ⁠ I always welcome opportunities to show the community how special our neighborhood salamanders are ...⁠ ⁠ #Salebrity

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Make Your Yard Friendlier For the Little Critters

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A neat article on making your yard more amphibian (and other wildlife) friendly:
https://medium.com/natural-world/make-your-yard-friendlier-for-the-little-critters-b2ee0ec5b047

#FlatwoodsSalamander mesocosms for #AmbystomaWeek⁠ ⁠ The majority of our Gulf Coast Frostys are kept in outdoor mesocosms (experimental artificial wetlands) at the #ARCC and their offspring will be candidates for release into the wild.⁠ ⁠ #StayFrosty

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Stunning #RingedSalamanders gorging on Black Worms in the #AmphibianLab at AF for #AmbystomaWeek ⁠ ⁠ We are working with researchers in MO to develop captive propagation protocols should repatriation efforts be necessary (i.e. populations of Ringed Salamanders continue to decline) Photo by Jessica Shartouny

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My son Anthony — the official 'namer' of AF in the field this weekend — showing off a beautiful #MarbledSalamander detected during the #MasterHerpetologist field trip. ⁠ ⁠ #AmbystomaWeek⁠ ⁠ The last known population of this species inside the metro perimeter.⁠ ⁠ We are so lucky to still be able to find these salamanders in our city, and monitor this population closely through our #MAAMP community science program.⁠ ⁠ maamp.us

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It's that time of year!!⁠ ⁠ #AmbystomaWeek⁠ ⁠ Time flies — please join in the 3rd annual celebration of the best (yes the BEST) family of salamanders. Sure, I am biased, but that doesn't make it any less true.⁠ ⁠ Here's a #MarbledSalamander in autumnal glory.

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The #MarbledSalamander field trip for the #MasterHerpetologist Program — that means it's #AmbystomaWeek !!!⁠ ⁠ Can't believe it's been another year ...⁠ ⁠ Here is a pair of nesting Marbled Salamanders under a car tire - found during the field trip on Saturday. These are some tough city sallies.

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AF Welcomes a supreme tortoise ambassador — Lola!

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It took Nancy and Roger 18 years to raise Lola from a hatchling to this magnificent tortoise. At about 90 pounds, Lola still has a lot of growing to do, and Nancy & Roger felt it was time to donate him to an institution. We were happy to welcome Lola to the Amphibian Foundation, and just know that he will be loved by both our staff, and by the hundreds of kids that will be amazed by how beautiful and friendly this tortoise is!

Lola was clearly raised with a lot of love, and having met quite a few adult sulcata tortoises, I can say that Lola is the friendliest I have ever met.

Well I’m not the world’s most masculine man. But I know what I am and I’m glad I’m a man and so is Lola.  Lo lo lo lo  Lola - Ray Davies



Center for Biological Diversity Includes the Frosted Flatwoods Salamander in their Report Highlighting 10 US Species at Risk from Climate Change

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